Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Toronto Comic Arts Festival

Nicely done! I really like this promo. The more obvious route for promoting a comic arts festival would be to show comics as the fun, naughty and brash black sheep of the art world — and (of course) be sure to exploit the often quirky personalities of the cartoonists, etc…

But here we see just the opposite. Artists thoughtfully describing their love for the tools of their craft, a smartly understated soundtrack, and sumptuous visuals of graphite and ink being applied to paper.

Cartooning will likely never get the respect it deserves, but seeing it presented this way leaves me feeling at least a little bit of hope.

Toronto Comic Arts Festival: Pencil it In from Toronto Comic Arts Festival on Vimeo.

FYI: Here are the credits…

Director: Christopher Hutsul
Director of Photography: Vinit Borrison
Producer: Nick Sorbara
Executive Producer: Jacinte Faria
Editorial: Melanie Hider, Bijou Editorial
Score: “Background Noise (Don’t Become)” by Solvent, Courtesy Ghostly International
Sound Design: Vapor Music
Online Artist + Colourist: Hardave Grewal, RedLab
Graphic Novelists: Chester Brown, Michael Comeau, Steve Charles Manale, Vicki Nerino, Michael Cho, Michael DeForge, Seth, Fiona Smyth + Britt Wilson.

A Hard Citizen Production.

Campbell’s Soup Creates Limited-Edition Andy Warhol Cans

via: Juxtapoz Magazine….

It was bound to happen. The world’s largest soup company, Campbell’s, is set to release (at Target no less) limited-edition Andy Warhol inspired soup cans to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Warhol’s infamous Campbell’s soup can art. Warhols’ seminal 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans remains his most iconic work, and while you go to buy bulk product remanufactured as hip mass commercialism (Target), you can have a slice of… limited-editioned soup. Use only in earthquake emergencies. As Adweek notes, “The cans, produced with the approval of (and a license from) The Andy Warhol Foundation, will be sold exclusively at Target, for 75 cents each, starting Sept. 2. Campbell’s is also sponsoring Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an upcoming exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.” Okay, that sponsorship thing is cool.

House Industries: Interview with Ken Barber

via: gestalten

House Industries: Interview with Ken Barber from Gestalten on Vimeo.

House Industries has been producing their premier league retro design and their true love…Fonts! Fonts! Fonts! since 1993. House Industries’ lead letterer Ken Barber recently visited us in Berlin to give a workshop at our Gestalten Space, which explored the creative process of hand-lettering and the application of illustrative letterforms in contemporary graphic design. We took this chance to interview him on Gestalten.tv where he talks about the necessity of specialization and the fine lines between lettering, typography, and font design.

HUMANAE project: Angelica Dass

via: flavorwire.com

Where Do You Fall on the Pantone Skin Color Spectrum?

Brazilian artist and photographer Angelica Dass’ fascinating HUMANAE project, which we spotted on designboom, takes that concept to whole new level. Using Pantone’s categorical system of coloring, Dass extracts and labels her subjects’ exact shades after taking an 11×11 pixel sample from their faces. Her aim is to catalog, through a scientific process, all possible human skin tones. Check out a selection of Dass’ incredible Pantone color matches after the jump, and then head over to her website to see even more from the project.

Poetry that grabs my attention (no small feat)

via: popupcity.net

Advertising Was The New Poetry

Blaise Cendrars claimed advertising to be the new poetry. Robert Montgomery makes us think the other way around. In his ‘Words in the City at Night’ series, the London-based artist hijacks large advertising billboards and bus stops to display his melancholic poems, echoing the Situationist concept of détournement. He explains:

“What interests me in working anonymously is that people encounter it without knowing its art. They know it’s not advertising, and it’s not graffiti either and they do not need an art history knowledge to read it. I’m super-interested in the ordinary person at the bus stop getting on the bus to their job everyday and suddenly seeing this weird text.”

 

“Blown Covers” from The New Yorker (even better than the published ones)

via: vice.com

Blown Covers with Françoise Mouly

By Nadja Sayej

It isn’t every day you get to interview Robert Crumb–but back in October, I spoke with the legendary comic artist for VICE about his gay marriage New Yorker cover, which was pulled before print. Crumb said New Yorker art editor Françoise Mouly and top editor David Remnick didn’t give him a clear reason as to why.

In response, Crumb created a manifesto-type bookmark that was inserted into the Danish Pavilion catalogue (the theme of the show was censorship), at the Venice Biennale, where I found it. When I asked him about this, he said he’d never work for the New Yorker again if they weren’t going to spell out the criteria for why they accept or reject art.

A few months after the article came out, Mouly announced that she would be publishing a book called Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See.

(continue…)

Basket Tree In Nantes, France (my son is going to want one of these!)

Via: Designboom:

A/LTA architects members jean-luc le trionnaire, alain tassot, maxime le trionnaire, gwénaël le chapelain have designed ‘arbre à basket’, a basketball court in the form of a tree that has been positioned in front of the maison des hommes et des techniques in Nantes, France.

The artistic installation offers a new way of interacting with sport venues, appealing to a larger demographic so many people can play simultaneously. the hoops branch at different heights allowing play for multiple teams and different age groups.

Perhaps the only thing “new” is the level of desperation

From the New York Times, December 3, 2011

Selling Books by Their Gilded Covers

Even as more readers switch to the convenience of e-books, publishers are giving old-fashioned print books a makeover.

Many new releases have design elements usually reserved for special occasions — deckle edges, colored endpapers, high-quality paper and exquisite jackets that push the creative boundaries of bookmaking. If e-books are about ease and expedience, the publishers reason, then print books need to be about physical beauty and the pleasures of owning, not just reading. (more)