Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: typography

Chris Ware’s Building Stories…. this thing is insane/extraordinary even by Chris Ware standards

I am blown away… yet again. What may appear at first glance to be the output of an entire career (photo below) is in actuality, just the multiple components of Building Stories, the latest project from Chris Ware.

From The Smithsonian:

The first thing you’ll notice about the collected Building Stories is that it’s not a book. It’s a box. It looks more like a board game than anything else. However, inside this box, there isn’t a game board and there aren’t any pieces. Instead, there are the 14 distinct books that compose Building Stories – ranging in style from standard comics to flip books to newspapers to something that looks like a Little Golden Book. Importantly, there are no instructions on how to read them or where to begin. While these books do indeed trace the lives of a small group of people (and a honeybee), the linear narrative is irrelevant –we’re just catching glimpses of their lives– and reading through the encapsulated stories is reminiscent of flipping through a stranger’s old photo albums.

Unboxing Chris Ware’s Building Stories from Digital Cultures Lab on Vimeo.

And (below) Chris Ware talks about Building Stories:

Exciting… beautiful… now please go fix it!

Link to site: Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000

I saw this exhibit a few months back – and it was well worth seeing. It was one of those lucky trips to the museum where, while there, you discover a number of unexpected exhibits that are really very good. I only just now stumbled over this part of the MOMA site where they decided to dedicate some vertuoso design to: Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000.

Actually, the design is beautiful, and would translate handsomely to a catalog or any print format. The actual “vertuoso” part that I was referring to is in the overly slick programming. A classic case pursuing every opportunity to make as many elements as possible flip, bounce, float, or scale at the mere hover of a mouse. I was soon moving the mouse very tentatively while cursing beneath my breath “I never clicked that damn thing – why is it jumping in front!

Naturally, I always want to be cautious and not rush to criticize a project that is clearly ambitious – because I can see the attempt here to make something fresh and new – but frankly this ends up mired in all of the worst excesses of an old-style Flash website. This was unfortunately art directed in a way that was completely sympathetic to the programming.

In an (apparent) attempt to showcase all that the web can be, we just end up with another case study in what happens when you try to shove a “web experience” down your visitors throat.

House Industries: Interview with Ken Barber

via: gestalten

House Industries: Interview with Ken Barber from Gestalten on Vimeo.

House Industries has been producing their premier league retro design and their true love…Fonts! Fonts! Fonts! since 1993. House Industries’ lead letterer Ken Barber recently visited us in Berlin to give a workshop at our Gestalten Space, which explored the creative process of hand-lettering and the application of illustrative letterforms in contemporary graphic design. We took this chance to interview him on Gestalten.tv where he talks about the necessity of specialization and the fine lines between lettering, typography, and font design.

Poetry that grabs my attention (no small feat)

via: popupcity.net

Advertising Was The New Poetry

Blaise Cendrars claimed advertising to be the new poetry. Robert Montgomery makes us think the other way around. In his ‘Words in the City at Night’ series, the London-based artist hijacks large advertising billboards and bus stops to display his melancholic poems, echoing the Situationist concept of détournement. He explains:

“What interests me in working anonymously is that people encounter it without knowing its art. They know it’s not advertising, and it’s not graffiti either and they do not need an art history knowledge to read it. I’m super-interested in the ordinary person at the bus stop getting on the bus to their job everyday and suddenly seeing this weird text.”

 

Off Book: Typography | PBS Arts

From pbs.org….

Type is everywhere. Every print publication, website, movie, advertisement and public message involves the creation or selection of a fitting typeface. Online, a rich and artistic typographical culture exists, where typefaces are created and graphic design seeps in to every image.

Typeface designers Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones outline the importance of selecting the right font to convey a particular feeling. Graphic designer Paula Scher talks about building identity in messaging, while Eddie Opara uses texture to create reaction. Infographic designers Julia Vakser and Deroy Peraza map complicated data sets into digestible imagery, mixing color, graphics and type.

Featuring Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones, Paula Scher, Eddie Opara, Deroy Peraza and Julia Vakser.

This is what graphic design looks like

Strength, simplicity, clarity of message, and working brilliantly with the materials at hand, as well as lettering (style, size and placement) that’s just about perfect. While everything else appears to be trying too hard, this is the most successful piece of design I’ve seen in a while. Congrats!

Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design

I had no idea of the degree to which this particular branch of graphic design was thriving, though it could clearly benefit from a little more originality. We may not always know when or where the next storm will be, but at least we know it’s sans-serif. Prepare accordingly.

And there is something particularly amusing about the dismal tracking on the word tracking in “Tracking Irene” (upper right). Amusing because someone was obviously paying some sort of (clearly misplaced) attention to it. They sure did tuck that R under the T with a crowbar, but were seemingly hit with a sudden bout of lethargy regarding the visual space between the R and the A.

And perhaps the next time anyone is attempting to create appropriate graphics for an important news event in 2011, they would be well advised to skip the cheesy 1980s Sci-Fi/Sports-ish typeface altogether.

A Different Kind of Beauty

From fastcodesign.com:

Dyslexie, A Typeface Designed To Help Dyslexics Read

Reading printed text is so fluid and transparent for most people that it’s hard to imagine it feeling any other way. Maybe that’s why it took a dyslexic designer to create a typeface that optimizes the reading experience for people who suffer from that condition. Christian Boer’s “Dyslexie” doesn’t exactly make the letterforms look conventionally beautiful, but since when is that a prerequisite for well-designed? If it works, it works. And according to an independent study by the University of Twente in Boer’s native Netherlands, it does work. (more…)