Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: sports

Inside the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s surprising baseball card collection

Via: ESPN:

Quick quiz: Where can you find the largest publicly available collection of baseball cards? If you said the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, give yourself a pat on the back. You’re right!

But here’s a trickier one: Where can you find the second-largest collection of baseball cards?

The answer, surprisingly enough, is the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Yes, really!

Here’s the back story: Long before the existence of baseball card conventions, memorabilia shops, eBay or chalky pink bubblegum, there was a guy named Jefferson Burdick. Burdick, who was born in 1900, was an electrician by trade. On the side, he was the most obsessive collector geek of his day, assembling history’s greatest collection of early American printed ephemera, including more than 30,000 baseball cards, some of them dating back to the 1880s. In those days, of course, baseball cards were mostly giveaways with tobacco products, and they didn’t yet have stats and other data on the back.

Anyway, as Burdick was moving into middle age, he began thinking about where he wanted his collection to end up. Baseball cards weren’t yet hot collectibles, so the idea that his cards might have commercial value never occurred to him. Instead, he proposed giving his collection to the Metropolitan Museum, which basically told him, “Sure, we’ll take it — as long as you catalog it and organize it first.” So Burdick spent years making daily trips to the Met, where he painstakingly put all his cards into albums. (continue to full article)

And much more about Jefferson Burdick here.

burdicks-grave

Storytelling on the Web

Storytelling is how we promote ideas, establish brands, and even define ourselves. It’s become clear how perfectly suited the web is for video. I’m referring to quality filmmaking, of course. This often gets obscured by the (somewhat astounding) fact that 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute—often making the good stuff hard to find.

I’ve gathered four videos that I’ve watched multiple times. All four are sports-themed, and, in my opinion, all four are very successful at what they’re trying to do.

In order, there are first two very emotional mini-documentaries: Royce White on Draft Day and Danny Webber’s First Football Game. Followed by two very commercial pieces: Pepsi’s “Uncle Drew” and Budweiser’s Hockey Flashmob.

Today I am a Red Sox fan (wait–did I just say that?!)

On June 1st, the San Francisco Giants became the first professional sports team to join the It Gets Better Project with a video featuring a handful of its players and coaches speaking out against bullying and homophobia towards LGBT kids and teens. This was quickly followed by similar videos from (in order) the Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, and Baltimore Orioles (with a commitment from the Seattle Mariners to be next). Many other baseball teams are being petitioned as well. As a New Yorker – and Yankee fan – it was a surprise (a wonderful surprise) to see the Red Sox being one of the first teams in. Sure, Boston is a great city, but the social climate is simply not the same as it is in San Francisco, making it perhaps even more impressive in my eyes.

While I was appreciating this welcome breakthrough on the part of professional athletes, I happened to come across this opinion piece in the Boston Globe online. A Boston attorney named Bennett Klein writes:

“Given the varying silence or negative messages about being LGBT, young LGBT people need to hear from their role models that yes, gay is good. Instead, the Red Sox video is full of generalities and platitudes that are at best meaningless and, at worst, unintentionally demeaning. Is Jason Varitek’s comment, “It’s okay to be your own unique being” really telling LGBT youth that they are not like everybody else? Jason, it would have been so powerful to simply say, “It’s okay to be gay.” The Sox video demonstrates that it is still too risky for professional athletes to make affirming statements about LGBT people. Professional athletes are so esteemed in our society that their statements can be real “game changers.” The Sox missed a great opportunity to change the game for LGBT youth.”

His piece can (and should) be read in its entirety.

And while I agree with him on many of the specifics, I still cannot see this as a “missed opportunity”. As a (very) jaded sports fan, this is far more than I would have ever expected, and a very promising first step.

Yankees, your move.