Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: publishing

Inside The World’s Hippest Underground Newsstand

About The Newsstand: An independent media take over of the Newsstand at the Metropolitan Avenue station in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Located at the intersection of the G and L trains, the Newsstand sees thousands of commuters pass by every day. This new shop will feature independent magazines and zines from around the world, curated by Lele Saveri of the 8-Ball Zine Fair especially for alldayeveryday.

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From The New York Times

The rumble of trains and the beeps of swiping fare cards don’t seem to distract shoppers huddled inside a tiny newsstand at the Metropolitan Avenue subway station in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. Some customers squat, flipping through literary magazines and novels with titles like “Killing Williamsburg.” Others thumb through booklets of photocopied Polaroids. There isn’t a daily paper or a gossip magazine in sight, and almost no one looks up when a curious commuter asks, “What is this place?”

This place is the Newsstand, a pop-up shop that has transformed an ordinary subway space into a store for independently published magazines, books, comics and zines. In a digitalized world, it is a small haven for printed media.

Continue to the full article

The Rise of Webcomics | Off Book | PBS

Via: Off Book | PBS:

The internet has given birth to yet another new medium: webcomics. Moving beyond the restrictions of print, webcomic artists interact directly with audiences who share their own unique worldview, and create stories that are often embedded in innovative formats only possible online. Sometimes funny, sometimes personal, and almost always weird, web comic creators have taken the comic strip form to new, mature, and artistic heights.

Featuring:
Christina Xu, Breadpig http://breadpig.com/
Nick Gurewitch, Perry Bible Fellowship http://pbfcomics.com/
Sam Brown, Exploding Dog http://explodingdog.tumblr.com/
Lucy Knisley, Stop Paying Attention http://comics.lucyknisley.com/
Andrew Hussie, Homestuck http://www.mspaintadventures.com/

Other Comics Featured:
XKCD http://xkcd.com/
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal http://www.smbc-comics.com/
Diesel Sweeties http://www.dieselsweeties.com/
Johnny Wander http://www.johnnywander.com/

Shirley Tucker on designing book covers

Shirley Tucker worked at Faber as a book cover designer alongside Berthold Wolpe. She joined in the late 50s and stayed until the 80s, her most well-known cover is the original 1966 edition of ‘The Bell Jar’ by Sylvia Plath. Here she discusses the process of designing a book cover.

And yes, we really used to do it this way…

Shirley Tucker on designing book covers from Faber and Faber on Vimeo.

Chris Ware’s Building Stories…. this thing is insane/extraordinary even by Chris Ware standards

I am blown away… yet again. What may appear at first glance to be the output of an entire career (photo below) is in actuality, just the multiple components of Building Stories, the latest project from Chris Ware.

From The Smithsonian:

The first thing you’ll notice about the collected Building Stories is that it’s not a book. It’s a box. It looks more like a board game than anything else. However, inside this box, there isn’t a game board and there aren’t any pieces. Instead, there are the 14 distinct books that compose Building Stories – ranging in style from standard comics to flip books to newspapers to something that looks like a Little Golden Book. Importantly, there are no instructions on how to read them or where to begin. While these books do indeed trace the lives of a small group of people (and a honeybee), the linear narrative is irrelevant –we’re just catching glimpses of their lives– and reading through the encapsulated stories is reminiscent of flipping through a stranger’s old photo albums.

Unboxing Chris Ware’s Building Stories from Digital Cultures Lab on Vimeo.

And (below) Chris Ware talks about Building Stories:

Perhaps the only thing “new” is the level of desperation

From the New York Times, December 3, 2011

Selling Books by Their Gilded Covers

Even as more readers switch to the convenience of e-books, publishers are giving old-fashioned print books a makeover.

Many new releases have design elements usually reserved for special occasions — deckle edges, colored endpapers, high-quality paper and exquisite jackets that push the creative boundaries of bookmaking. If e-books are about ease and expedience, the publishers reason, then print books need to be about physical beauty and the pleasures of owning, not just reading. (more)

Quality time with Ed Wood

I was recently re-reading Nightmare of Ecstasy: The Life and Art of Edward D. Wood, Jr., an oral history of Ed Wood recounted by those that worked with him, and Hollywood Rat Race by Ed Wood Jr., his attempt at offering “advice” to young actors and filmmakers on making it in Hollywood.

From Publisher’s Weekly on Hollywood Rat Race:
Wood offers tips on how to be discovered in Hollywood (you won’t, stay at home); how to achieve stardom (become a character actor the likes of Jonathan Hale, Jane Darnell, Addison Richards and a seemingly endless list of other Hollywood nobodies of the 1950s); how to elude the casting couch (or at least, how to distinguish, and sleep with, legitimate producers rather than “phonies”); and how to comport oneself in debtor’s court. This somewhat entertaining glimpse of Hollywood’s sleazy side won’t disillusion those who think of Wood as an inept writer – his work is filled with mindless cliche’s (“You’re only as good as your last picture!”) – and numerous, even obsessive, references to fluffy white angora sweaters. The irony of Wood’s authorship of this manual (unpublished until this printing) during the 1960s, one of the bleaker times in his career, will be apparent to all readers – as will Wood’s understandable bitterness as he spews out unending invective against the “phonies” who take advantage of young, angora sweater-wearing talent. While this brief book isn’t quite bad enough to rank with Woods’s most distinctive creations, dedicated fans will find it a howler.

EXTRA: I was also pleased to find a quite good quality video of his “classic” Plan 9 From Outer Space at the Internet Archive.