Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: literature

“This is water, this is water.”

This is Water from Patrick Buckley on Vimeo.

Taken from David Foster Wallace commencement address given to the graduates of Kenyon College in 2005

There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says “Morning, boys. How’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes “What the hell is water?”

This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little parable-ish stories. The story [“thing”] turns out to be one of the better, less bullshitty conventions of the genre, but if you’re worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise, older fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don’t be. I am not the wise old fish. The point of the fish story is merely that the most obvious, important realities are often the ones that are hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a banal platitude, but the fact is that in the day to day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes can have a life or death importance, or so I wish to suggest to you on this dry and lovely morning….

Inside The World’s Hippest Underground Newsstand

About The Newsstand: An independent media take over of the Newsstand at the Metropolitan Avenue station in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Located at the intersection of the G and L trains, the Newsstand sees thousands of commuters pass by every day. This new shop will feature independent magazines and zines from around the world, curated by Lele Saveri of the 8-Ball Zine Fair especially for alldayeveryday.

03NEWSSTAND2-popup

From The New York Times

The rumble of trains and the beeps of swiping fare cards don’t seem to distract shoppers huddled inside a tiny newsstand at the Metropolitan Avenue subway station in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. Some customers squat, flipping through literary magazines and novels with titles like “Killing Williamsburg.” Others thumb through booklets of photocopied Polaroids. There isn’t a daily paper or a gossip magazine in sight, and almost no one looks up when a curious commuter asks, “What is this place?”

This place is the Newsstand, a pop-up shop that has transformed an ordinary subway space into a store for independently published magazines, books, comics and zines. In a digitalized world, it is a small haven for printed media.

Continue to the full article

Shirley Tucker on designing book covers

Shirley Tucker worked at Faber as a book cover designer alongside Berthold Wolpe. She joined in the late 50s and stayed until the 80s, her most well-known cover is the original 1966 edition of ‘The Bell Jar’ by Sylvia Plath. Here she discusses the process of designing a book cover.

And yes, we really used to do it this way…

Shirley Tucker on designing book covers from Faber and Faber on Vimeo.

Poetry that grabs my attention (no small feat)

via: popupcity.net

Advertising Was The New Poetry

Blaise Cendrars claimed advertising to be the new poetry. Robert Montgomery makes us think the other way around. In his ‘Words in the City at Night’ series, the London-based artist hijacks large advertising billboards and bus stops to display his melancholic poems, echoing the Situationist concept of détournement. He explains:

“What interests me in working anonymously is that people encounter it without knowing its art. They know it’s not advertising, and it’s not graffiti either and they do not need an art history knowledge to read it. I’m super-interested in the ordinary person at the bus stop getting on the bus to their job everyday and suddenly seeing this weird text.”

 

Perhaps the only thing “new” is the level of desperation

From the New York Times, December 3, 2011

Selling Books by Their Gilded Covers

Even as more readers switch to the convenience of e-books, publishers are giving old-fashioned print books a makeover.

Many new releases have design elements usually reserved for special occasions — deckle edges, colored endpapers, high-quality paper and exquisite jackets that push the creative boundaries of bookmaking. If e-books are about ease and expedience, the publishers reason, then print books need to be about physical beauty and the pleasures of owning, not just reading. (more)