Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: culture

Storytelling on the Web

Storytelling is how we promote ideas, establish brands, and even define ourselves. It’s become clear how perfectly suited the web is for video. I’m referring to quality filmmaking, of course. This often gets obscured by the (somewhat astounding) fact that 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute—often making the good stuff hard to find.

I’ve gathered four videos that I’ve watched multiple times. All four are sports-themed, and, in my opinion, all four are very successful at what they’re trying to do.

In order, there are first two very emotional mini-documentaries: Royce White on Draft Day and Danny Webber’s First Football Game. Followed by two very commercial pieces: Pepsi’s “Uncle Drew” and Budweiser’s Hockey Flashmob.

Sadly beautiful New York Magazine cover

It’s often asked where Art Direction ends and Design begins. As the digital world has afforded individuals unprecedented control of their work, the line between art direction and graphic design has further blurred. Here is a perfect example where the art direction is the design. And I would hope that as fellow designers look at this magazine cover, the “art director” in them will be reminded that when a photograph contains this much beauty and information, then your job is to just stay out of the way and allow it to shine. The stormy skies, the familiar bright lights of Manhattan at night, and the near-perfect infographic of the devastated (dark) parts of the city. Read below to see the challenges of getting this shot.

Via: poynter.org

Architecture photographer explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot

Shooting in the dark, with a handheld camera, in a vibrating helicopter, 5,000 feet above land sounds like a photographer’s nightmare. But Iwan Baan made it look easy.

The Dutch photographer’s image of a half-illuminated, half-powerless New York City in the wake of Hurricane Sandy captured the nation’s attention on the cover of New York magazine.

“It was the only way to show that New York was two cities, almost,” Baan said on the phone Sunday evening from Haiti. “One was almost like a third world country where everything was becoming scarce. Everything was complicated. And then another was a completely vibrant, alive New York.”

Baan made the image Wednesday night after the storm, using the new Canon 1D X with the new 24-70mm lens on full open aperture. The camera was set at 25,000 ISO, with a 1/40th of a second shutter speed.

“[It was] the kind of shot which was impossible to take before this camera was there,” Baan said.

It was more difficult to rent a car than a helicopter in New York the day after Sandy, Baan said. And because there was such limited air traffic so soon after the storm, air traffic control allowed Baan and the helicopter to hover very high above the city, a powerful advantage for the photo.

…continue for full text

First Person: Gary Anderson “I designed the recycling symbol”

From the Financial Times….

First Person: Gary Anderson | As told to Katie Engelhart

‘I designed the recycling symbol’

I studied engineering at the University of Southern California at a time when there was a lot of emphasis in the US on training young people to be engineers. It was in the years after Sputnik and the philosophy was that America was in danger of falling behind the Russians in the technical arena. That said, I eventually switched to architecture. I just couldn’t get a grasp on electronics. Architecture was more tangible.
I got my bachelor’s degree in 1971 and stayed on to do a master’s. It was around that time that I saw a poster advertising a design competition being run by the Container Corporation of America. The idea was to create a symbol to represent recycled paper – one of my college requirements had been a graphic design course so I thought I’d give it a go. (Full text at FT Magazine online)

Kirby Ferguson: Embrace the Remix

New York filmmaker Kirby Ferguson speaking at TED

From the TED website…

What’s a remix? In Kirby Ferguson’s view, any piece of art that contains a recognizable reference to another work–a quote from a lyric, a borrowed riff, a filmic homage. Which makes almost everything a remix, from a Led Zeppelin song to a classic film from George Lucas. His deeply researched and insanely fun four-part web series, “Everything Is a Remix,” dives into the question: Is remixing a form of creativity, a production of the new on the shoulders of what precedes it, or is it just copying? He comes out firmly on the side of creativity, calling for protections for people who, with good intentions, weave together bits of existing culture into something fresh and relevant.

And be sure to watch the complete 4-part series.

Harvey Pekar statue to be dedicated at Cleveland Heights’ Lee Road library on October 14th

From The Cleveland Plain Dealer….

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS — The late Harvey Pekar will soon become a permanent fixture of one of his most beloved haunts; the Lee Road branch of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library.

A statue of Pekar at the library will be dedicated at a ceremony scheduled for Oct. 14. Entitled “Harvey Pekar: A Literacy, Library Life,” the event will include a presentation by JT Waldman, the illustrator who collaborated with Pekar on his posthumously publish graphic novel, “Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me.”

The famed author of the autobiographical comic book series “American Splendor” — which inspired a critically acclaimed 2003 movie of the same name — Pekar, 70, died in July 2010 at his East Overlook Road home in Cleveland Heights. A Coventry Road staple for decades, the Shaker Heights High School graduate was also an almost daily visitor, and longtime supporter, of the Lee Road library.

“That library was Harvey’s first love and second home,” said Pekar’s widow, Joyce Brabner.

(more…)

The project is explained—mostly by his wife Joyce Brabner—on Kickstarter (video above) where most of the money was raised

Toronto Comic Arts Festival

Nicely done! I really like this promo. The more obvious route for promoting a comic arts festival would be to show comics as the fun, naughty and brash black sheep of the art world — and (of course) be sure to exploit the often quirky personalities of the cartoonists, etc…

But here we see just the opposite. Artists thoughtfully describing their love for the tools of their craft, a smartly understated soundtrack, and sumptuous visuals of graphite and ink being applied to paper.

Cartooning will likely never get the respect it deserves, but seeing it presented this way leaves me feeling at least a little bit of hope.

Toronto Comic Arts Festival: Pencil it In from Toronto Comic Arts Festival on Vimeo.

FYI: Here are the credits…

Director: Christopher Hutsul
Director of Photography: Vinit Borrison
Producer: Nick Sorbara
Executive Producer: Jacinte Faria
Editorial: Melanie Hider, Bijou Editorial
Score: “Background Noise (Don’t Become)” by Solvent, Courtesy Ghostly International
Sound Design: Vapor Music
Online Artist + Colourist: Hardave Grewal, RedLab
Graphic Novelists: Chester Brown, Michael Comeau, Steve Charles Manale, Vicki Nerino, Michael Cho, Michael DeForge, Seth, Fiona Smyth + Britt Wilson.

A Hard Citizen Production.

Campbell’s Soup Creates Limited-Edition Andy Warhol Cans

via: Juxtapoz Magazine….

It was bound to happen. The world’s largest soup company, Campbell’s, is set to release (at Target no less) limited-edition Andy Warhol inspired soup cans to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Warhol’s infamous Campbell’s soup can art. Warhols’ seminal 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans remains his most iconic work, and while you go to buy bulk product remanufactured as hip mass commercialism (Target), you can have a slice of… limited-editioned soup. Use only in earthquake emergencies. As Adweek notes, “The cans, produced with the approval of (and a license from) The Andy Warhol Foundation, will be sold exclusively at Target, for 75 cents each, starting Sept. 2. Campbell’s is also sponsoring Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an upcoming exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.” Okay, that sponsorship thing is cool.

HUMANAE project: Angelica Dass

via: flavorwire.com

Where Do You Fall on the Pantone Skin Color Spectrum?

Brazilian artist and photographer Angelica Dass’ fascinating HUMANAE project, which we spotted on designboom, takes that concept to whole new level. Using Pantone’s categorical system of coloring, Dass extracts and labels her subjects’ exact shades after taking an 11×11 pixel sample from their faces. Her aim is to catalog, through a scientific process, all possible human skin tones. Check out a selection of Dass’ incredible Pantone color matches after the jump, and then head over to her website to see even more from the project.

Poetry that grabs my attention (no small feat)

via: popupcity.net

Advertising Was The New Poetry

Blaise Cendrars claimed advertising to be the new poetry. Robert Montgomery makes us think the other way around. In his ‘Words in the City at Night’ series, the London-based artist hijacks large advertising billboards and bus stops to display his melancholic poems, echoing the Situationist concept of détournement. He explains:

“What interests me in working anonymously is that people encounter it without knowing its art. They know it’s not advertising, and it’s not graffiti either and they do not need an art history knowledge to read it. I’m super-interested in the ordinary person at the bus stop getting on the bus to their job everyday and suddenly seeing this weird text.”