Whoa… you damn well can’t do that anymore!
This is what graphic design looks like
Dyslexie, A Different Kind of Beauty
Well, if it isn't the old typeface bait-and-switch
Seeking a full-time position in hurricane logo design
Today I am a Red Sox fan (did I just say that?!)

Category Archives: comics

The Rise of Webcomics | Off Book | PBS

Via: Off Book | PBS:

The internet has given birth to yet another new medium: webcomics. Moving beyond the restrictions of print, webcomic artists interact directly with audiences who share their own unique worldview, and create stories that are often embedded in innovative formats only possible online. Sometimes funny, sometimes personal, and almost always weird, web comic creators have taken the comic strip form to new, mature, and artistic heights.

Featuring:
Christina Xu, Breadpig http://breadpig.com/
Nick Gurewitch, Perry Bible Fellowship http://pbfcomics.com/
Sam Brown, Exploding Dog http://explodingdog.tumblr.com/
Lucy Knisley, Stop Paying Attention http://comics.lucyknisley.com/
Andrew Hussie, Homestuck http://www.mspaintadventures.com/

Other Comics Featured:
XKCD http://xkcd.com/
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal http://www.smbc-comics.com/
Diesel Sweeties http://www.dieselsweeties.com/
Johnny Wander http://www.johnnywander.com/

Chris Ware’s Building Stories…. this thing is insane/extraordinary even by Chris Ware standards

I am blown away… yet again. What may appear at first glance to be the output of an entire career (photo below) is in actuality, just the multiple components of Building Stories, the latest project from Chris Ware.

From The Smithsonian:

The first thing you’ll notice about the collected Building Stories is that it’s not a book. It’s a box. It looks more like a board game than anything else. However, inside this box, there isn’t a game board and there aren’t any pieces. Instead, there are the 14 distinct books that compose Building Stories – ranging in style from standard comics to flip books to newspapers to something that looks like a Little Golden Book. Importantly, there are no instructions on how to read them or where to begin. While these books do indeed trace the lives of a small group of people (and a honeybee), the linear narrative is irrelevant –we’re just catching glimpses of their lives– and reading through the encapsulated stories is reminiscent of flipping through a stranger’s old photo albums.

Unboxing Chris Ware’s Building Stories from Digital Cultures Lab on Vimeo.

And (below) Chris Ware talks about Building Stories:

Harvey Pekar statue to be dedicated at Cleveland Heights’ Lee Road library on October 14th

From The Cleveland Plain Dealer….

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS — The late Harvey Pekar will soon become a permanent fixture of one of his most beloved haunts; the Lee Road branch of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library.

A statue of Pekar at the library will be dedicated at a ceremony scheduled for Oct. 14. Entitled “Harvey Pekar: A Literacy, Library Life,” the event will include a presentation by JT Waldman, the illustrator who collaborated with Pekar on his posthumously publish graphic novel, “Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me.”

The famed author of the autobiographical comic book series “American Splendor” — which inspired a critically acclaimed 2003 movie of the same name — Pekar, 70, died in July 2010 at his East Overlook Road home in Cleveland Heights. A Coventry Road staple for decades, the Shaker Heights High School graduate was also an almost daily visitor, and longtime supporter, of the Lee Road library.

“That library was Harvey’s first love and second home,” said Pekar’s widow, Joyce Brabner.

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The project is explained—mostly by his wife Joyce Brabner—on Kickstarter (video above) where most of the money was raised

Toronto Comic Arts Festival

Nicely done! I really like this promo. The more obvious route for promoting a comic arts festival would be to show comics as the fun, naughty and brash black sheep of the art world — and (of course) be sure to exploit the often quirky personalities of the cartoonists, etc…

But here we see just the opposite. Artists thoughtfully describing their love for the tools of their craft, a smartly understated soundtrack, and sumptuous visuals of graphite and ink being applied to paper.

Cartooning will likely never get the respect it deserves, but seeing it presented this way leaves me feeling at least a little bit of hope.

Toronto Comic Arts Festival: Pencil it In from Toronto Comic Arts Festival on Vimeo.

FYI: Here are the credits…

Director: Christopher Hutsul
Director of Photography: Vinit Borrison
Producer: Nick Sorbara
Executive Producer: Jacinte Faria
Editorial: Melanie Hider, Bijou Editorial
Score: “Background Noise (Don’t Become)” by Solvent, Courtesy Ghostly International
Sound Design: Vapor Music
Online Artist + Colourist: Hardave Grewal, RedLab
Graphic Novelists: Chester Brown, Michael Comeau, Steve Charles Manale, Vicki Nerino, Michael Cho, Michael DeForge, Seth, Fiona Smyth + Britt Wilson.

A Hard Citizen Production.

“Blown Covers” from The New Yorker (even better than the published ones)

via: vice.com

Blown Covers with Françoise Mouly

By Nadja Sayej

It isn’t every day you get to interview Robert Crumb–but back in October, I spoke with the legendary comic artist for VICE about his gay marriage New Yorker cover, which was pulled before print. Crumb said New Yorker art editor Françoise Mouly and top editor David Remnick didn’t give him a clear reason as to why.

In response, Crumb created a manifesto-type bookmark that was inserted into the Danish Pavilion catalogue (the theme of the show was censorship), at the Venice Biennale, where I found it. When I asked him about this, he said he’d never work for the New Yorker again if they weren’t going to spell out the criteria for why they accept or reject art.

A few months after the article came out, Mouly announced that she would be publishing a book called Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See.

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